GY TODAY – TUESDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER 2018

GY TODAY – TUESDAY 11TH SEPTEMBER 2018

Search continues for missing man last seen at bar

Searches are continuing today for a missing 25-year-old man who was last seen in a Great Yarmouth bar.

Tony Green was last seen on Saturday night at Bar X in Northgate Street.

This morning Norfolk police confirmed officers are continuing searching for him, with the assistance of the Norfolk Fire and Rescue Service.

His family say he is vulnerable and has type one diabetes.

He lives in family homes in Lowestoft and Great Yarmouth and his family say it is out of character for him to go missing.

Mr Green is white, 5ft 5in of a thin build with light brown hair. It is believed he may be wearing a black shirt, khaki/green trousers, a black belt with a fancy belt buckle and black shoes.

Anybody who has seen Mr Green or knows of his current whereabouts should contact Norfolk Police immediately on 999 quoting CAD 459 of Saturday 8 September 2018.

Tony Green Picture: Tony Green's family

PHOTO SOURCE: GREAT YARMOUTH MERCURY

 

Police call for people in Norfolk to report signs of adults who are being abused

Victims of adult abuse are being urged to seek help as Norfolk police support a national awareness campaign to highlight the issue.

Safeguarding Adults Awareness Week, which runs until Friday, aims to raise awareness of how to recognise the different types of adult abuse and what to do if you think someone is being abused or is at risk of being abused.

There are many signs of abuse, which include the person: looking dirty or is not dressed properly; having an injury that’s difficult to explain; being frightened around certain people, being unusually down or withdrawn and finding money missing.

There are many different types of abuse such as:

Physical, emotional or sexual abuse

Financial abuse – when people take money or belongings without asking

Neglect – when people who are there to help do not look after people properly

Discriminatory abuse – when people treat others badly or unfairly because they are different

Institutional abuse – when paid staff in a hospital or care home do not care properly or respect people’s rights

Domestic abuse – threatening behaviour, violence or abuse between adults who are, or have been, in a relationship, or between family members

Self-neglect – when people don’t look after themselves and this puts them at risk

Modern slavery – when people are forced to work or are bought or sold as if they were a piece of property

If you are worried about an adult at risk or concerned about someone’s safety, you can contact Norfolk’s adult social services on 0344 800 8020 or fill out an online form at https://online.norfolk.gov.uk/socialcareenquiry.

You can also contact police on 101 or 999 in an emergency.

Norfolk police solved just six percent of rape crimes in last year, figures reveal

Norfolk’s chief constable has admitted the county’s rate of solving domestic abuse and rape crimes do not make good reading – with just one in 16 of the latter solved.

For the 2017/18 financial year, just 6% of reported rapes resulted in a charge, while 21% of the 7,564 domestic abuse reports were solved.

The figures were revealed in an annual report from the office of the police and crime commissioner, discussed at a meeting of the county’s police and crime panel.

Simon Bailey, chief constable of Norfolk Police, admitted the figures were a concern, but said these were in a large part due to victims choosing not to pursue investigations.

He said: “It is an incredibly complex matter. The figures do not make good reading but I can assure we are doing everything we can.

“Often victims no longer wish to prosecute, which is nothing to do with the policing; sometimes they do not want to give evidence because they want to get on with their lives or do not want to relive it.”

Lorne Green, Norfolk’s police and crime commissioner added that on occasions, police body cameras had meant that in domestic abuse incidents charges could be made without the victim wishing to prosecute.

Mr Bailey added: “Around a third of reports we received were historic, meaning we are working without forensic evidence.

“The incidents will have also taken place in private, where it is one person’s word against another.”

The chief constable also said victims not wanting to relinquish their phones for evidence was another barrier.

He added: “For some people, their phones are their lives, so they are reluctant to give them up and will decide against going ahead for that reason too.”

The figures also show that more than half of the county’s domestic abuse victims did not support prosecution, while the same can be said about four in 10 rape reports.

At the same meeting, panellist Peter Hill requested future figures be provided in number form, rather than in percentages.

The exact number of rape reports was not included in the report, but it is understood there were about 900.

 

 

 

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